Our Setting
The Districts of New Corsica

Larger Image here The following are descriptions of the various districts of New Corsica. Click one of the names to skip to its entry.

Bastion Island
Bay View
Castle Cliffs
The Docks
The Dregs
East End
Foundation Blvd
Industry Shores
Little Haiti
Little Warsaw
Newgate
Old Bastion
Tenement Quarter
Town Center
Bastion Island
Bastion Island is a long breaker island shielding Everett Bay from the rest of the Gulf of Mexico. It is a lushly forested island, populated with willows and other trees that can stand the moist brackish environment. Up until the mid-20th century, the island was only populated by a few homes of fishermen or boatmen. However, when the Bastion Bridge was constructed linking it to the main island, things changed. Bastion Island is now the haven for the upper middle class in New Corsica. Its hilly shores are populated with homes of the well-enough, though not truly rich like Castle Cliffs.

Bastion Island was the site of the first French settlements in the area, and is the site of Bastion State Park. The ruins of the old French fortress are found in the park, and the park service offers regular tours of the area, along with a modest museum of French colonial history. Other evidence of the French influence abounds, such as the Monroe Plantation, owned by the colony’s first governor, which is preserved by the city as a historical site.

Bay View
Bay View was the original wealthy district in modern New Corsica. Townhouses stand in regimented rows on the curving streets. Most of the houses were built in the 1890s to 1920s. Bay View has a spotted history, however. Several fires have devastated it. The worst one swept through the district in 1905 bring a death toll that was in the tens of thousands. Today, Bay View is the home of those who are rich enough to get out of the Tenement Quarter, but not rich enough to live on Bastion Island or in Castle Cliffs. Bay View is also the site of much of the city’s art community. Several galleries maintain themselves here.

Castle Cliffs
The most beautiful country around New Corsica is found in Castle Cliffs. Vast stands of elms populate the lush ground, and bring with them fireworks of color during the fall. The forests ride up to the edge of the tall cliffs responsible for the district’s name. Castle Cliffs is the place of the truly rich. Vast mansions with huge ballrooms are the home to the great social events of the city, and are nestled between the trees. The wealthy live in a decadence that harkens back to the age of robber barons and rail tycoons, full of tinkling wine glasses and elaborate parties.

The Docks and Warehouse District
New Corsica dies without its port. Gate Bay has calmer waters than Everett Bay, so it was chosen to house the tankers and shipping docks of one of the largest trade centers in the South. Tankers come in with crude for the refineries on Industry Shores, and freighters transports wood and trade goods from throughout South America and the Caribbean. Also, New Corsica is unofficially recognized as one of the best smuggling centers for the South. The area is bleak. The jagged metal towers of loading cranes near the shores give way to vast fields of sheet-metal warehouses and rusting storage tanks. Barbed-wire fences wall off fields of cargo containers.

The Dregs
For all the blight that exists in the Tenement Quarter, the Dregs are the places where few feel safe going at night. The relatively regimented Tenement Quarter gives way to a mismatched sprawl of slums. Glaring billboards and water towers look down from the building tops. A vast mismatched immigrant population, featuring everyone from Russians to Cubans, are found here, most of them working as day workers in the docks and warehouses to the south.

East End
While crime is a reality in the Dregs, it’s a tradition in the East End. The East End is not as blatantly dangerous as the Dregs. But it is the sin center of the city. The red light district swarms with the pleasures of the flesh, and dealers sell fresh product from the docks. The area is populated with rows of seedy nightclubs, strip joints, sex shops and gambling dens. It is widely known to be under organized crime’s watch, so the gangs usually stay clear out of self-preservation. Foundation Boulevard
While the actual street stretches all the way to City Hall, when someone says they are ‘going to the Boulevard’, they mean the north end on the mainland. Foundation Boulevard is a vast stretch of dance clubs and music venues. Its neon patchwork marks it plainly, and the youth of New Corsica flock here. New Corsica is home to a vibrant industrial and metal scene, and live acts from hardedge new bands are common and are a source of much revenue.

Macabre stands as one of the paramount clubs of the city. The dark metal club rises three stories over the street. It makes little of itself in outer decorations, though the line outside is always long to get in. Other clubs of note include Infernalis, king of all things industrial, and The Speakeasy, a classy joint styled after a Twenties speakeasy.

Industry Shores
Spanning off into the distance, a vast patchwork of boilers, piping and smoke stacks rises from the shores of the Gulf. Rusting towers of steel and smoke mark the area known as Industry Shores. Once heralded as a symbol of progress, Industry Shores is now a symbol of the dark industrial heart of New Corsica. Oil refineries and industrial chemical plants are the order of the day here, and the sprawl of pipes and metal goes off far beyond the city limits.

Little Haiti
The marshy land of Little Haiti has long been a home to free blacks and Caribbean immigrants who found their way to New Corsica. It is the center of New Corsica's Caribbean culture.The neighborhoods are poor and overgrown. Most of the modern houses were built during work programs in the Depression. Their rotting boards and fleshy paint mark every street. The surrounding swamps constantly threaten to consume the place whole, while vines climbs into every available edifice. Further north, less and less roads are paved, until Little Haiti becomes only a few houses on stilts sticking out of the Lousiana swampland.

Little Haiti is most notable as being home to a very active voodoo community. Especially in the northern parts of the district, rituals are public and accepted. While the voudounistas are glad to sell trinkets and talismans to visitors, the actual voodoo community is quite insular and suspicious of outsiders. And there is definite tension between the Haitian families, who regard their practices to be quite superior, and other magic traditions in the area.

Little Warsaw
Throughout the first part of the Twentieth Century, New Corsica saw many waves of immigration from Poland, Hungary and other parts of Eastern Europe. A majority of these immigrants settled in the area now known as Little Warsaw. Architecturally, Little Warsaw is similar to the Tenement Quarter, with tenement buildings and winding maze-like streets. Culturally, it is very different. The immigrant communities of Little Warsaw are tightly knit, and a strong sense of community pervades the streets. The side streets and alleys are known to be home to many curious shops, run by elders from the old country who sell rare books and antiques.

The name Little Warsaw is a bit of a misnomer. While the initial settlement was most definitely Polish, there have been many others. Little Warsaw has residents who originate from Italy, Hungary, and a myriad of other European countries. It is also home to a large population of Orthodox Jews, who mostly live around Bash Aram Synagogue, the largest synagogue in Louisiana.

Newgate
The glass and stone skyscrapers of Newgate mark the bustling financial district of Newgate. Home to the most expensive real estate in Lousiana, Newgate is the most modern part of New Corsica. It hosts decadent office plazas and looming buildings that provide homes to some of the most powerful merchant banks in the world. Here, companies and men are made or broken day to day. At night the powerful retire to their penthouses to sip wine and contemplate the day's victories. Newgate is also home to the New Corsica Rapid Transit System, the local subway. While stations span out to become elevated trains through the Tenement Quarter and Little Warsaw, the system is built to mainly serve Newgate and its needs.

Old Bastion
Analogous to New Orleans' French Quarter, Old Bastion contains most of the old French colony and pre-Civil War architecture to be found in New Corsica. The old buildings are preserved and protected, and overgrown plantation houses line the smaller streets. Old Bastion is steeped in history and the past. However, it has not aged quietly or kindly. The cobblestone streets echo with the past and craft a spell where it is easy to believe in boogeys, vampires and things that go bump in the night.

Tenement Quarter
The Tenement Quarter is well-named. Block upon blocks of them range over this area, broken up sporadically by playgrounds, elevated rails and shops. Some of the apartment buildings here are more than eighty years old, and a large amount of New Corsica's 'working poor' live here. Crime varies, depending on whether it is a election year or not. The Tenement Quarter is a slice of the past to visitors, a piece of city life that suburbia and urban development had long disposed of. But here as with many things, New Corsica has kept to older ways.

Town Center
Town Center is the crux of government activity in New Corsica. It is the smallest of the districts, but very distinct in character. Bronze statues seem to mark every street corner, and broad office buildings stretch themselves over every block. The municipal and parish governments make their home here. It is also home to several federal offices, such as the local branches of the FBI, Federal Marshals and Internal Revenue Service. The keystone of the area is City Hall, an imposing circular neo-classical building with a domed-top.