Our Setting
Landmarks of Chicago

Sears Tower

The Willis Tower, built and still commonly referred to as Sears Tower, is a 108-story, 1,451-foot (442 m) skyscraper. At completion in 1973, it surpassed the World Trade Center towers in New York to become the tallest building in the world, a title it held for nearly 25 years. The Willis Tower is the second tallest building in the United States and the 14th tallest in the world. The tower has numerous Tenants including US Airlines, which means its security is top notch. For the kindred of the city to meddle in the many industries that have a home in Sears Tower brings swift and merciless reprisal from all those that have known the dangers of economic upheaval and remember the desperation of failing cities during the Depression.

Cloud Gate

Cloud Gate is a public sculpture by Indian-born British artist Anish Kapoor, that is the centerpiece of AT&T Plaza at Millennium Park in the Loop community area of the city. The sculpture and AT&T Plaza are located on top of Park Grill, between the Chase Promenade and McCormick Tribune Plaza & Ice Rink. Constructed between 2004 and 2006, the sculpture is nicknamed The Bean because of its shape. Made up of 168 stainless steel plates welded together, its highly polished exterior has no visible seams. It measures 33 by 66 by 42 feet (10 by 20 by 13 m), and weighs 110 short tons. The Bean has capture more then one Toreador in its grip and has been defaced a few times by Anarchs and other less savory kindred to the chagrin and brutal reprisal of the city's toreador whom have long protected art even beyond the hallowed halls of Elysium.

Union Station

Chicago Union Station is a major railroad station that opened in 1925 in Chicago, replacing an earlier station built in 1881. It is the only intercity rail terminal in Chicago, as well as being the city's primary terminal for commuter trains. The station stands on the west side of the Chicago River between West Adams Street and West Jackson Boulevard, just outside the Chicago Loop. Including approach and storage tracks, it is about nine and a half city blocks in size. Its facilities are mostly underground, buried beneath streets and skyscrapers. This makes it both beloved and often protected by the Nosferatu of the city as it gives them, and kindred at large easy and ready access to a hub of intercity transport.

Chicago Union Station is the third-busiest rail terminal in the United States, after Grand Central Terminal and Penn Station, both in New York City. It is Amtrak's overall fourth-busiest station. It is one of Chicago’s most iconic structures, reflecting the city’s strong architectural heritage and historic achievements

Navy Pier

Navy Pier is a 3,300-foot-long (1,010 m) pier on the Chicago shoreline of Lake Michigan. It is located in the Streeterville neighborhood of the Near North Side community area. The Navy Pier currently encompasses more than fifty acres of parks, gardens, shops, restaurants, family attractions and exhibition facilities and is the top leisure destination in the Midwest, drawing nearly nine million visitors annually. It is one of the most visited attractions in the entire Midwestern United States and is Chicago's number one tourist attraction. Kindred however find it a mixed blessing, for all its mortal movement and revenue it also makes for a dangerous flow of kine both in the chance of being observed and those that come to visit here.

The Pier itself has a spotted history as its served as everything from a economic center in the form of maritime trade to a prison for draft dodgers, the pier itself seems to have a schizophrenic recollection of its past which some of the more aware kindred hint at on particularly dark nights.

Gold Coast

The Gold Coast Historic District is a historic district in Chicago, Illinois. Part of Chicago's Near North Side community area, it is roughly bounded by North Avenue, Lake Shore Drive, Oak Street, and Clark Street.

The Gold Coast neighborhood grew in the wake of the Great Chicago Fire. In 1882, millionaire Potter Palmer moved to the area from the Prairie Avenue neighborhood on the city's south side. He filled in a swampy area which later became Lake Shore Drive, and built the Palmer Mansion, a forty-two room castle-like structure designed by Henry Ives Cobb and Charles Sumner Frost. Other wealthy Chicagoans followed Potter into the neighborhood, which became one of the richest in Chicago.

In the late 1980s, the Gold Coast and neighboring Streeterville comprised the second most-affluent neighborhood in the United States, behind Manhattan's Upper East Side. For Kindred to have a public haven in this area is a status symbol; those that can not only afford, maintain, but show off such a place to the population at large proves either their bravado or the depths of their resources.

Lincoln Park Zoo

Lincoln Park Zoo is a free 35-acre zoo located in Lincoln Park in Chicago, Illinois. The zoo was founded in 1868, making it one of the oldest zoos in the U.S. It is also one of a few free admission zoos in the United States. The zoo is an accredited member of the Association of Zoos and Aquariums.

Lincoln Park Zoo is home to a wide variety of animals. The zoo's exhibits include big cats, polar bears, penguins, gorillas, reptiles, monkeys, and other species totalling about 1,100 animals from some 200 species. Also located in Lincoln Park Zoo is a burr oak tree which dates to 1830, three years before the city was founded.

To damage the burr oak tree in the Zoo is to invite certain death, no brash kindred vandal has survived such an act longer then a month, most vanish without a trace.

Water Tower Plaza

Water Tower Plaza is a large urban, mixed-use development comprising a 758,000 sq ft shopping mall and 74 story skyscraper in Chicago, Illinois, United States. The mall is located at 835 North Michigan Avenue, along the Magnificent Mile. It is named after the nearby Chicago Water Tower. Its opening changed the economic face of the magnificent mile and its hotly debated by local kindred to either be a modern blasphemy on the shopping experience or a wonderful evolution in commerce.

Jackson Park

Jackson Park is a 500-acre (2 km²) park on Chicago's South Side, located at 6401 South Stony Island Avenue in the Woodlawn community area. It extends into the South Shore and Hyde Park community areas, bordering Lake Michigan and several South Side neighborhoods. Named for President Andrew Jackson, it is one of two Chicago Park District parks with the name Jackson, the other being Mahalia Jackson Park in the community area of Auburn Gresham on the far southwest side of Chicago. The parkland was first developed as the host site of the Chicago World's Fair in 1893.

The park's history has made it a fond to many of the city's kindred and those with a more outdoor minded spirit often find this is the place to wander at night to escape the city without braving the horrors of the true wild places. The Osaka Garden, originally created during the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition, with a garden and a Japanese Ho-O Den (Phoenix Temple) for the government of Japan, as a pavilion for the exposition. The phoenix emblem, was a reference Chicago rising like the mythical firebird from the ashes of the Great Chicago Fire of 1871. It was designed by Landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted. After the fair, even as most of the fair was burned or torn down, the garden and the Ho-O Den Pavilion remained intact. The Pavilion is a favorite late night gathering spot of local Kindred.

Buckingham Fountain

A Chicago landmark in the center of Grant Park. Dedicated in 1927, it is one of the largest fountains in the world. Built in a rococo wedding cake style and inspired by the Latona Fountain at the Palace of Versailles, it is meant to allegorically represent Lake Michigan. It operates from April to October, with regular water shows and evening color-light shows. During the winter, the fountain is decorated with festival lights.

The fountain is considered Chicago's front door, since it resides in Grant Park, the city's front yard near the intersection of Columbus Drive and Congress Parkway. The fountain itself represents Lake Michigan, with four sea horses symbolizing the four states—Illinois, Wisconsin, Michigan and Indiana—that border the lake. The fountain was designed by beaux arts architect Edward H. Bennett. The statues were created by the French sculptor Marcel F. Loyau. The design of the fountain was inspired by the Bassin de Latome and modeled after Latona Fountain at Versailles.

The Fountain itself is often looked upon kindly by the local Ventrue whom are rumored to have been party to its construction, perhaps in some forgotten bond with the Toreador.

University of Chicago

The University of Chicago (UChicago, Chicago, or U of C) is a private research university in Chicago. The university, established in 1890, consists of The College, various graduate programs, and interdisciplinary committees organized into five academic research divisions, six professional schools, and the Graham School of Continuing Liberal and Professional Studies. Beyond the arts and sciences, Chicago is also well known for its professional schools, which include the Pritzker School of Medicine, the Booth School of Business, the Law School, the School of Social Service Administration, the Harris School of Public Policy Studies, and the Divinity School.

University of Chicago scholars have played a major role in the development of various academic disciplines, including: the Chicago school of economics, the Chicago school of sociology, the law and economics movement in legal analysis, the Chicago school of literary criticism, the Chicago school of religion, and the behavioralism school of political science. Chicago's physics department helped develop the world's first man-made, self-sustaining nuclear reaction beneath the university's Stagg Field. Chicago's research pursuits have been aided by unique affiliations with world-renowned institutions like the nearby Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) and Argonne National Laboratory, as well as the Marine Biological Laboratory. The university is also home to the University of Chicago Press, the largest university press in the United States.

Founded by the American Baptist Education Society with a donation from oil magnate and wealthiest man in history John D. Rockefeller, the University of Chicago was incorporated in 1890; William Rainey Harper became the university's first president in 1891, and the first classes were held in 1892. Both Harper and future president Robert Maynard Hutchins advocated for Chicago's curriculum to be based upon theoretical and perennial issues rather than on applied sciences and commercial utility. With Harper's vision in mind, the University of Chicago also became one of the 14 founding members of the Association of American Universities, an international organization of leading research universities, in 1900.

The University is well regarded by every clan that looks to the future of the many fields it studies and has been touched by many. Though it has a special place for the Tremere, Ventrue, and Toreador whom heavily patronize it. Though the Brujah have often been known to be invested in the students and what is taught there.

Chinatown

The Chinatown neighborhood in Chicago, Illinois, is on the South Side (located in the Armour Square community area), centered on Cermak and Wentworth Avenues, and is an example of an American Chinatown, or ethnic-Chinese neighborhood. Chicago is the second oldest settlement of Chinese in America after the Chinese fled persecution in California. The present Chicago Chinatown formed about 1915, after settlers moved steadily south from near the Loop where the first enclaves were established in the 19th century.

Chinatown is sometimes confused with an area on the city's North Side sometimes referred to as "New Chinatown", which is centered on Argyle Street and is somewhat of a misnomer given that it is largely represented by people of Southeast Asian heritage.

Chinatown is known to the city's Kindred as a place where the strange and uncanny can occur. Often, you can encounter things that might not be found elsewhere, and those interested in the occult do a great deal of work in the small shops run by quiet experts that not only preserve their own heritage, but all knowledge persecuted by those who don't understand it.

Oak Woods Cemetery

Oak Woods Cemetery was established on February 12, 1853; it covers an area of 74 hectares (183 acres) and is located in the Greater Grand Crossing area of Chicago's South Side. The first burials took place in 1860. Soon after the American Civil War, several thousand Confederate soldiers, prisoners who died at Camp Douglas, were buried here. A monument says that 6,000 soldiers were buried here and lists names of more than 4,000.

These bodies had originally been buried at City Cemetery but were exhumed and reinterred together in a mass grave, which came to be known as Confederate Mound, reported to be the largest mass grave in the Western Hemisphere.

While Kindred can visit the dead have power and it is enforced by all those old enough to recall or have beloved retainers, family, or children buried here. This often a spot Neonates are encouraged to enter on dares, and though many claim it underwhelming some come back with more harrowing tales.

Jackson Park

Jackson Park is a 500-acre (2 km²) park on Chicago's South Side, located at 6401 South Stony Island Avenue in the Woodlawn community area. It extends into the South Shore and Hyde Park community areas, bordering Lake Michigan and several South Side neighborhoods. Named for President Andrew Jackson, it is one of two Chicago Park District parks with the name Jackson, the other being Mahalia Jackson Park in the community area of Auburn Gresham on the far southwest side of Chicago. The parkland was first developed as the host site of the Chicago World's Fair in 1893.

The park's history has made it a fond to many of the city's kindred and those with a more outdoor minded spirit often find this is the place to wander at night to escape the city without braving the horrors of the true wild places. The Osaka Garden, originally created during the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition, with a garden and a Japanese Ho-O Den (Phoenix Temple) for the government of Japan, as a pavilion for the exposition. The phoenix emblem, was a reference Chicago rising like the mythical firebird from the ashes of the Great Chicago Fire of 1871. It was designed by Landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted. After the fair, even as most of the fair was burned or torn down, the garden and the Ho-O Den Pavilion remained intact. The Pavilion is a favorite late night gathering spot of local Kindred.

Little Italy

Little Italy, sometimes called University Village, is a neighborhood on the Near West Side of Chicago, Illinois. The current boundaries of Little Italy are Ashland Avenue on the west and Interstate 90/94 on the east, the Eisenhower Expressway on the north and 18th Street to the south. It lies between the west side of the University of Illinois at Chicago campus in the Illinois Medical District and the east side of the University of Illinois at Chicago campus. The community is made up of diverse ethnic and socio-economic backgrounds as a result of immigration, urban renewal, gentrification and the growth of the resident student and faculty population of the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC). Its Italian-American heritage primarily evident in the Italian-American restaurants of Taylor Street. The neighborhood is home to the National Italian American Sports Hall of Fame as well as the historic Roman Catholic churches Our Lady of Pompeii, Notre Dame de Chicago, and Holy Family.

The recent history of the neighborhood waves of urban renewal, starting with the construction of expressways in the 1950s, the development of UIC in the 1960s, the demolition of public housing in the 1990s and 2000s, and redevelopment of Maxwell Street in the 2000s. Along with these changes, housing prices in the area have risen.

Local Kindred however know that despite the changes to the face of the area, the heart of it has remained the same. Little Italy at its heart remains a slice of the old world nestled in the new. And while in day light it is welcoming at night only those that know the way should enter without respect if not fear.

New Greektown

Greektown is a dining and nightlife district on the Near West Side of the American city of Chicago, Illinois. It is one of many neighborhoods that make up the Near West Side community area, and is popular with tourists and Chicago residents alike. Greektown's bars and restaurants lie roughly between Van Buren and Madison Streets, along Halsted Street, west of the Loop.

The area once had a large Greek American population, but many residents have left the neighborhood, spreading throughout Chicago and the suburbs. Today, Greektown consists mostly of restaurants and businesses, although a cultural museum and an annual parade and festival highlight the continuation of Greek heritage in Chicago. The local Kindred often find the shops here easy to access and the timing of the area more in tune with their natural schedules. Though with all of the city's ethnic districts one can misstep if not careful this area tends to be the most forgiving, or perhaps its simply more welcoming with a longer memory.

Lower Michigan Avenue

Nestled in the darker parts of the city sits The Michigan Avenue Underground. The area was constructed to run under Michigan Avenue in order to ease the congestion of traffic. This area is dark, never escaping twilight even at the height of day. Here streetlights that were installed never got fixed as they burned out and crime and danger runs rampant. Known by the mortals as "the Underground," the city's homeless reside here in droves due to it's proximity to the subterranean levels of the buildings above, which keep the area slightly warmer than usual. Despite the danger here, many of the city's Nosferatu reside amongst the humanity that calls this place refuge and the area has also gained a reputation as a "Kindred Gas Station" - mainly due to Kindred finding easy-pickins' when they are desperate for blood.